From:

Homoeopathic Drug Pictures (Classics in homoeopathy)

by Margaret L Tyler

If I had not seen a few patients myself [who got better literally in SECONDS-MINUTES I would probably not have believed what is written below.

CHAMOMILLA


MODEST LITTLE WEED which flourishes about this time of the year in rick-yards
among the litter of thrashings, with its acrid scent, and its white petals that bend backwards, as if putting their little hands behind them.


An excellent name for Chamomilla is Cannot bear it”.
“Can’t bear himself.”
“Can’t bear other people.”
“Can’t bear pain” (Coffea, Acon.).
Can’t bear things: wants them, and hurls them away.
Everything is simply intolerable.
You look at the Chamomilla baby and often see one brilliant cheek: you touch its head, and find it warm and wet.
Cham, is one of Clarke’s “Nursery A.B.C. drugs”—Acon., Bell., Cham.
Aconite is turmoil in circulation. Belladonna is turmoil in brain. Chamomilla is turmoil in temper.
If Cham. is a sick baby he is easily spotted. He will whine and howl and insist on being carried. The moment the tired mother or the jaded father tries to sit down, or to set him down, the music starts afresh; and the trouble is worse at night.
Or, short of this, he stretches out his little hand for thing after thing, and when it is offered pushes it away in disgust. “He does not know what he wants” (says Nash), “but the doctor knows—it is Chamomilla.”
When a little older Cham., when sick, will order his nurse or mother out of the room. We have seen a mother crouching outside a closed door, inside which her small sick son was raving if she dared to poke her nose inside.

When still older he will refuse to see the doctor. I think it is Nash who says, when you know you have to see an “ugly” patient, who will refuse to see you, or will be rude to you, send on first a dose of Cham. and find peace.
Cham. is definitely uncivil.
The Chamomilla pain is intolerable. One has seen a person tramping the floor in agony, after a bad tooth-extraction; when a small dose of Cham. gave almost instant and complete relief.
One has seen a person with ’flu, not getting well as quickly as desired, and suddenly impatient and irritable to a degree. A dose of Cham. and the temperature promptly came down.
Some time ago we published a case of asthma, with such irritability that Cham. stared the doctor in the face. It was given, and cured. Hahnemann said, “Do not give Acon. where sickness is borne with calmness and patience”; and of Cham. he wrote, “It is unsuited for persons who bear pain calmly and patiently.”
In acute cases where Cham. is urgently demanded by the mental state, you can pull out your watch and count the very few minutes to complete relief.
The nature of the ailment matters little, it is the mentality that simply shouts for Chamomilla